UPDATE: The Decay of Bread and Teabags in Perspex Boxes: 4 months

My moulding perspex box sculptural pieces are becoming even more interesting. I have never left items to go mouldy for this long before. It has been about 4 months now, you would never leave bread for example to mould for that long in your household fridge or home cupboards. Below are some images i’ve taken of the boxes at this stage in their progression.

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The tea bags seem to have reached a stage where they are not moulding rapidly anymore. They have a furry exterior developing on them and a greeny tinge growing on the bags but this hasn’t progressed as quickly as it was in the last three weeks. The bread box is a highly successful piece, it continues to mould day by day, it is no longer even recognisable as piece of bread, what has suprised me most that I never predicted would happen is the amount that it has shrunk within the box. There is an aray of texture and colour developing on the bread, the yellow spots are particularly interesting and an unusal surface is developing. I will continue to document these boxes and blog more stages of their moulding until my final assessment.

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DANIELE DEL NERO: HIGHLY INSPIRATIONAL DECAYING BUILDINGS

Whilst exploring decay as an art from across the internet, I came across an article (link below) entitled “ARTIST USES MOULD TO CREATE DECAYED ARCHITECTURAL MODELS” and was obviously instantly interested.

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2010-11/30/mould-art

Artist Daniele Del Nero creates architectural scale models of buildings and then dampens the exterior of the structure and applies a thin dusting of flour. The model is then placed into a transparent case, which relates to my moulding perspex boxes. Mould starts to grow after a couple of days and dies within two weeks, leaving behind what the artist has described as “a dusty spider-web which covers the model like a rambler plant“.

Like me with my actual moulding artwork , He avoids having direct contact with the mould, removing the cover over the models only to photograph them. He has also related Food Decay to the Decay of the world in a way like I have. This is highly related to me using mould to show pollution and climate change in my factory piece. I have mentioned in my reflective journal a few times about how mould and decay can relate to the end of the world or its breakdown, I appear to have found an artist that feels the same way. He states “We are used to imagining our cities as permanent and definitive, but it’s amazing how little time it takes for nature to reclaim its spaces.”

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These works are AMAZING, they are definitely my favourite works out of all the other artists I’ve come across that use mould to create art. The photographs are beautiful as well as the pieces themselves. His work encourages me experiment with getting a more professional photo of my perspex boxes and other moulding objects as I don’t feel these would look as successful without the high level of photography and dark background. There is something very eery about these pieces, but I absolutely love them. Daniele Del Nero’s work is without a doubt a success. He wanted to “reproduce in small-scale the particular sensation of being in a lonely, abandoned place” and I feel he has without a doubt achieved this. He is a massive inspiration to me right now and his work definitely makes me want to experiment with creating 3D works and to use mould to create a certain feeling or atmosphere.


Mould can Damage Artwork as Well as Create It! – Leonardo Da Vinci, Self Portrait

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2165248/Fears-famous-Leonardo-da-Vinci-self-portrait-poor-condition-restore.html

Leonardo Da Vinci’s self-portrait is a prime example of how mould can damage artwork. As stated in an article written by the daily mail (link above), art experts fear that its days on show are numbered as its exposure to the elements on one of those occasions has left it covered in mould and what they call “foxing” and in too poor a condition to restore.

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Here we have a strong juxtaposition between the idea that mould can create art but also damage and eventually destroy it. This is a concept that I could work with to create artwork by drawing something and covering it some kind of food material that will grow mould and therefore damage it.  I could also combine paint with food items in a piece to give the impression that mould was damaging artwork but it would actually be creating it. It is a shame that one of the works from a great master such as Da Vinci is decaying over time but it is also very influential to my work and encourages to think about using this juxtaposition to create art within my project.